Sunday, June 6, 2021

With 44,778 collateral consequences nationwide, how do you know which ones affect your client?

Wait---how many collateral consequences? That's right, count 'em, 44,778. That's the number returned on an unlimited search for collateral consequences across all jurisdictions in the National Inventory of Collateral Consequences of Conviction.

That raw number's not very helpful when you want to advise a particular client whether a felony conviction will interfere with her work as a podiatrist, a pawn broker, or a pest-control professional. But the collateral consequences inventory can help. You can search by any combination of jurisdiction, consequence, key word, and offense type to narrow your results and answer your client's questions.

If your client is not a US citizen, you'll also want to consult the latest report on Immigration Consequences of Criminal Activity by the Congressional Research Service. There you can learn what criminal convictions trigger inadmissibility and deportation, or affect naturalization, relief from removal, or immigration benefits. Remember: we have a constitutional duty to accurately inform our clients of these consequences. See, e.g., United States v. Johal, No. 19-17244, 2021 WL 1511504 (9th Cir. Apr. 16, 2021) (IAC to overstate deportation risk, causing client to reject plea options that may have avoided deportation and proceed to trial).

Want to read more about collateral consequences and recent efforts to limit them? Check out the Collateral Consequences Resource Center; reports from the Prison Policy Initiativethis article about bipartisan momentum for clean-slate and fair-chance policies; and this essay about how collateral consequences flowing from criminal records entrench racial inequality.

Finally, once you learn how many (both temporary and lifelong) collateral consequences your client faces, consider arguing that the district court should take those consequences into account at sentencing. See, e.g., United States v. Jaime, 235 F. Supp. 3d 262 (D.D.C. 2017).

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